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Our Home


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Our Home


Our staff works to alleviate the burden of poverty and abuse for a young life and to provide fuel for a bright future.


We Are Becoming’s home is an intimate, family style house, designed to be a welcoming place for every person who enters - for all to be acknowledged and respected, regardless of their past or present troubles. The home is dedicated to female transition-aged youth, ages 21-24 years old to create daily rhythms of shared meals, conversations, goal setting and doing life together. Our hope is for each person to experience God’s love, healing and restoration.

Three phases of personal growth as we are becoming

SECURITY

Develop a deep sense of safety and security. Residents’ most basic life needs for shelter, food, sleep, clothing and other personal needs will be addressed.

IDENTITY

Goal setting, healing and identity formation. Residents are immersed in a structured program for personal progress and emotional stability with an underlying goal to address the effects of trauma.

MATURITY

Maturity and leadership. Residents are empowered with tools for independent living, ready to contribute to their wider community and to affect positive change in our society.

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Homeless Transition-Aged Youth


Homeless Transition-Aged Youth


Who Are Homeless Transition-Aged Youth?


The U.S. Department of Education defines homeless youth as youth who “lack a fixed, regular, and nighttime residence,” these individuals are living on their own, without a parent or a guardian, and lacks stable housing increasing their vulnerability for sexual abuse, sexual exploitation, prostitution, or drug abuse.

Transition-aged youth (TAY), 18 to 24 years old, are one of the fastest growing homeless populations and require unique housing and services because they are still developing as young adults and need support until they are able to support themselves, gain life experience, and transition to adulthood.*


Youth Homelessness is unique because young  people

• are physically, emotionally, psychologically, spiritually and socially still developing – they are adults-in-progress with unique strengths and assets
• enter into homelessness with little or no work experience
• are often forced into leaving their education (i.e. junior high and high school) as a result of their homelessness
• experience high levels of criminal victimization, including sexual exploitation
• often enter into homelessness without life skills such as cooking, money management and job searching.*

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Homeless Transition-Aged Youth


Homeless Transition-Aged Youth


 

DID YOU KNOW...


 
 

The Department of Justice estimates that every year, over 1.7 million youth experience homelessness living on the streets of America.

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More than 1 in 3 homeless youth  engage in“survival sex” - trading sex for food, clothing, drugs and a safe place to sleep for a night. 
 

 
 

1 out of 7 youth will runaway from home to escape parental conflicts, sexual and/or physical abuse before their 18th birthday.

Rates of major depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse are 3 times higher among homeless youth.

 

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Stephen Gaetz, director of the COH says profoundly- “Providing (young) people with three hots (meals) and a cot - however well meaning that is - it really doesn’t address the issues. They need housing, which is not the same as an emergency shelter bed. They need adult support and mentoring. They need a chance to recover if they’ve experienced trauma. They need safety. They need a chance to get back to school. We have to stick with them for a long time, until they’re stable.”